Tagged: whore

Filming ‘Refugee’: Behind The Scenes

Director: Melissa Fergusson

DOP: Tim Butler-Jones

1st AD/Sound Tech: Rob Ipsen

Location Manager: John Blackman

MUA: Angela Crumpe

Hair Designer: Jordan Camilleri 

Stylist: Melissa Fergusson

Refugee: Rebecca Parr

Psych patient: Gaby Turner

Counsellor: Rob Ipsen

Foreigner: John Blackman

Dealer: Baz Te Hira

John: Rhys Collier

Featured extras: Laura Ehlen-Wilson, Olliver Fergusson, Hudson Turner, Cooper Turner

Special thanks to Katherine Hair, The Rose Centre, John Blackman, Paper Bag Princess,  Love Your Condom, Splice, Four Eyes Media & Donna Banichevic-Gera x

   
    
    
    
    
    
    

    
    

   
 

Production Meeting (2): ‘Refugee’

Director: Melissa Fergusson 1st AD: Rob Ipsen DOP: Tim Butler-Jones MUA: Angela Crumpe Hair Designer: Jordan Camilleri Refugee (Lead): Rebecca Parr Counsellor: Rob Ipsen Psych patient: Gaby Turner Dealer: Baz Te Hira Foreigner: John Blackman John: Rhys Collier

http://charlatancliniclimited.com/2015/08/18/production-meeting-2-refugee/

Interview with L.Y.C (Love Your Condom): Ricky Te Akau

1. When/why was LYC initiated?

L.Y.C is a community-focused programme designed to create a condom culture across Aotearoa New Zealand. L.Y.C encourages all gay and bisexual men to use condoms and lube every time they have sex. It is a sexy, upbeat call to ‘love your condom’. ‘Love your condom’ is about moving us past all those lame excuses not to be safe, and inspires us to not just tolerate, but love the sexy confidence that comes with condom covered cocks.

L.Y.C recognises that gay and bisexual men, the people most at risk of HIV, are influenced by their partners, whānau, friends, colleagues, employers and the environment in which they live. While it is essential that L.Y.C reaches and affects all gay and bisexual men living in Aotearoa New Zealand, it is also necessary to reach the people who can support, influence and enable gay and bisexual men to use condoms and lube every time they have anal sex. L.Y.C. Was originally launched in 2009 in it’s first iteration as ‘Get It On!’.

2. What is your role at NZAF?

I am the Social Marketing Coordinator Maori and look after aspects of online and mass media of L.Y.C. with a particular focus on Takatāpui and their whanau.

3. What is your opinion on sex work?

I believe in choices especially choices that empower individuals and allow lives to be lived and no judgements be made. As the old adage says sex work is the oldest profession and has been happening since the dawn of time . . . I think the stigma attached to sex work and workers is a new one.

4. Do you know the current statistics of HIV/AIDS in NZ?

The best place for the most up to date information would be to visit our website at NZAF http: http://www.nzaf.org.nz/

5. What services do NZAF & LYC offer?

Again all our NZAF services are listed on our website with LYC being the social marketing arm that promotes safe sexy times and being empowered in making the right decisions.

6. How could other people in society support NZAF?

There are no boundaries to assisting NZAF be it with your time in volunteering or through donating in a monetary sense. Our doors are always open.

7. What other organisations do NZAF work with?

The list is endless! We work with and support various organisations who likewise support LGBTQI and heterosexual people in either HIV prevention, people living with HIV and those who are there for assistance.

8. Tell me about the last World HIV/AIDS conference you attended in Melbourne last month?

Melbourne was an amazing opportunity to be able to see what other countries are doing in research, prevention and assistance for those affected directly and indirectly with HIV/AIDS. Some 15,000 passionate people from around the world attended and this brought about effective networking, sharing and valuable knowledge.

9. Why do you think HIV/AIDS is still so stigmatized in modern society?

The lack of knowledge around transmission and those that are affected by it. More education around the epidemic is needed and with this would come greater acceptance.

10. What do you think of the word ‘WHORE’?

The word has been bandied around for years and is inexplicably connected with prostitution . . . and in this sense is used in a derogatory way. I’m not one for name calling . . . and don’t think WHORE is an offensive word.

Interview With NZPC Founder, Sex Work Activist & Former Sex Worker: Catherine Healy

1. When/Why did you establish NZPC?

We established NZPC in 1987 to support each other and to address the illegality of our work in the face of police arrests and the potential of HIV to affect our work. We were determined to make conditions related to our work safer and had to to build awareness that legislative change was needed for this to happen.

2. Do you directly work with sex workers’ Catherine?

Most of my work involves direct work with sex workers on a daily basis.

3. What is your stance on underage sex work?

NZ shifted its focus to one of protecting sex workers who are under the age of 18, as opposed to one of prosecuting these young people. This used to be the case before the law changed in 2003.

4. Do you know the current statistics of sex workers in NZ?

I’m aware there are thousands of people who are either sex workers, or who have been sex workers, and who live and work quietly in New Zealand. There are many more people who pay sex workers.

5. What services do NZPC offer?

We focus on working safely, and supporting sex workers to access relevant information which can assist them to do this. People who are considering sex work approach NZPC as do those who want to move away from sex work. We support all.

6. How could other people in society support NZPC?

We are aware there are many individuals and organisations who support NZPC by referring those sex workers who may not know about us, to us. This is important support.

7. What other organisations do NZPC work with besides Women’s Refuge?

We work with a tremendous variety of organisations from Family Planning Association to Sexual Health Services to the NZ AIDS Foundation as well as government organisations.

8. Tell me about your involvement in decriminalizing prostitution in NZ? This bill was passed in 2003?

NZPC was instrumental in pushing for the decriminalisation of sex work. I first presented to a select committee as a representative of NZPC calling for this change in 1989. Decriminalisation of sex work has improved the occupational safety and health of sex workers throughout NZ. Street based sex workers were most frequently arrested and convicted of soliciting and it was a demeaning experience.

9. Why do you think ‘sex work’ is still so stigmatized in modern society?

Sex work is stigmatised because non sex workers are not really listening to the diverse voices of sex workers, and are only happy when sex work is depicted as a horrible “empty” experience. Sex workers would say it’s a lot of different kinds of experiences and want to be treated normally, and not as some problem to be fixed.

10. What do you think of the word ‘WHORE’?

WHORE is understood by sex workers to mean, “We Honour Ourselves with Respect and Empowerment.” It is a word which has been reclaimed by sex workers everywhere.

Interview with Violinist: Etienne Bizjak

1. When/how did you discover your ‘love’ of music?
When I (first) heard my father play the violin. I was about 5 years old. That made me feel a real ‘intense’ moment of happiness.

2. Where do you get your inspiration from?
From my emotions and feelings. Life hands me experiences, which I communicate through my music.

3. How long have you been playing the violin?
For 20 years…

4. How did you come by the name ‘Twistin’ the Swing’?
Twistin’ the Swing is the young brother of Fever Swing. A cover band that Mike and I created when we started to play Gyspy swing music. After two years playing together, we needed something fresh to bring our original music to the public. It’s really hard to think of a name! We are really bad at it. I remember that we wanted something ‘original’ which doesn’t sound like a cover band. Swing is the kind of music we (still) play. Twistin’ because we liked the word, and that brings the idea of something distorted.

5. Tell me more about your last gig with WHORE?
I went to see the play three times because my friend is one of the characters. I met all the actors, Melissa and the rest of the team and felt a really good connection with them. So at Lot23, we naturally played music and hope to collaborate again soon.

6. Who would you like in your next or future audience? Universal records?
I don’t expect anyone in particular. I’d like to see anyone (really) who I can entertain, and also make them happy while listening to us.

7. Any influences?
Stephane Grappelli, Django Reinhardt, Alexandre Cavalière and many others!

8. What is the most interesting thing about you?
I am an aerospace engineer.

9. Do you eat breakfast?
Sometimes. I love having breakfast, however it depends of what I have to eat (in the house) and what time I get up!

10. What makes you smile?
A lot of differents things. I try to smile (all the time) because it makes life a little easier. I notice when I busk on the street, people smile which makes me feel really content. Hopefully I brightened their day – this makes my music meaningful.

Interview with Y&T: Fashion Designer Yuka O

1. When/why was Y&T founded?

Y&T started with the intention of raising funds for the tragic earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Fashion is what I love and know – so naturally this is what I could contribute to make this happen. My husband Tristan and I worked on our first range with all the proceeds going to aid. Yuka&Tristan was founded in 2011, April.

2. Where do you get your inspiration?

Anything that gets me interested at any given time, which then becomes my inspiration/concept to develop the range – architecture, paint, books, design, music etc. Also, I deal with very beautiful fabric – I often get inspired by that too.

3. Have you always loved fashion?

Yes. Always. x

4. What is your go to magazine?

I love Japanese fashion Magazines: Ginza, Fudge Internatinal – The Gentle Woman, Numero, Vogue NZ – Home

5. Have you had any Y&T collections in ‘NZ Fashion Week’ or offshore catwalk? Future plans?

I haven’t thought about doing catwalk into NZ fashion week yet – however I’d definitely love to experience this, if the opportunity arose. I have some exciting news to be revealed soon… (but can’t tell yet) so please stay tuned ! via /yukaandtristan – facebook / @Yuka&Tristan – twitter / #yooksasyuka – instagram

6. Who would you (really) like to wear your brand?

Tilda Swinton

7. Any influences?

Yoji Yamamoto, Kenzo

8. Are you living your ‘dream-job’?

Yes, Although It’s a really tough business – I feel super lucky to do what I love. Big thanks to my husband.

9. When it comes to chocolate -Cadbury or Whittakers?

Whittakers – I choose by label 🙂

10. What makes you smile?

My young children who try to tell me stories about their (daily) adventures, mostly about their school endeavours – those cute explanations are the most gorgeous of things.

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Play Reading: Whore

Let the storytelling begin!

‘Whore’ is a collection of monologues based on true events; about sex workers who live in Auckland, New Zealand. After extensive research, meetings and interviews; the work can (now) start.

The stories have unique titles called: Illegal Migrant, ‘Married Woman’, ‘Transgender’, ‘Underage Sex Worker’, ‘Rent Boy’ and ‘Refugee’. Performing in late May, in an alternative space: ‘charlatan clinic style’.

The cast involved: Rebecca Parr, Lee Ah Yen Faatoia and Geraldine Creff.

This project is in collaboration with up to 20 ‘creative’ people, and I am excited to be leading this process.

Join us on Facebook for all the updates –

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Whore/805486722811024?ref=hl