Tagged: social media

Interview with Filmmaker & Director: David Blyth

1. Tell me about your latest project?

I have been working on a feature film project with writer Thomas Sainsbury

over the last couple of years. It’s not horror, more a continuing

interest/exploration of characters on the fringes of society.

 

2. Who is your greatest inspiration in film and why?

Luis Bunuel, a Surrealist film maker. Because his films reveal that the

unconscious plays a huge role in our conscious lives and his stories move

seamlessly between dream, fantasy and reality. Bunuel’s first film with

Salvador Dali, Un Chien Andalou, was an inspiration for my own first short

film Circadian Rhythms and the follow up feature film Angel Mine.

 

3. Is horror your preferred genre, as a filmmaker?

Horror is a genre that encompasses a wide range of approaches to telling

stories. I am interested in the psychological and supernatural/magical

elements of our consciousness and the horror genre best describes the

exploration of these areas.

 

4. What do you love about directing?

I love the process of working creatively with others to organically

manifest emotional atmospheres which audiences can engage and resonate

with. Creativity requires participation without fear, and directors role is

to enrol cast and crew into a shared vision that ultimately takes on its

own reality.

 

5. What lessons have you learnt as a prolific filmmaker?

Communication skills are very important at all stages of the film making

process. You have to give yourself permission to make films, if you wait

for “others” to bestow permission, you may be waiting a long time. Most

importantly don’t project your vision on the universe, rather see your

vision in what the universe is showing you.

 

6. Tell me about your most successful film?

Death Warmed Up, 1984, is likely the film that has travelled the world most

successfully and continues to be requested Internationally for relicensing.

Unfortunately this film has a backstory that is tragic. The original film

negative was burnt mistakenly by the Lab in Wellington. The 35mm Inter-

negative is lost in America. No complete 35mm prints exist, and over 32

cuts were made to one of the few one inch tape copies of Death Warmed Up to

survive. So Death Warmed Up has a very bitter sweet place in my life.

 

7. What is the most memorable film you have seen and why?

Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner would have to be the ground breaking film along

with Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead that fuelled certain elements of the vision

presented in Death Warmed Up.

 

8. Do you think the dvd is now redundant?

DVD’S will have an on-going role in private collections and specialised

lending institutions. Mass consumption is moving with the digital times

towards watching online and downloading. I am sorry to see the DVD lose its

position and predict there will be no DVD stores left within two years.

 

9. What makes a good story?

Anything that engages one emotionally that allows universal

truth/understanding to emerge, exploration of the microcosm allows

reflection on the macrocosm.

 

10. Lastly, any advice for emerging filmmakers?

Stick with your vision of the project. It’s a marathon not a sprint. You

need to pace yourself through the inevitable highs and lows. Time is the

micro budget film makers biggest supporter. Flexibility around cast and

crews life commitments, allow a window of opportunity, that ensure you get

the best from everybody whether they are being paid or not.

#SMCAKL: The Social Marketplace

 

What social media channels do you use? How do you monetise your platforms? At what stage can you measure conversions? These questions were put to the panel of social media savvy entrepreneurs & start-up founders last night at Social Media Club, Auckland. The panel of speakers: Makaia Carr (Motivate Me), Ken Brickley (BuddyBid), Wendy Thompson (Socialites) & Alex Mackrill (GrabOne) voiced their opinions on what has worked for them on brand strategy, business growth, customer engagement & innovative marketing on social. I learnt that New Zealander’s love and engage with Facebook more than any other social media platform & is the most successful for monetisation. What about Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat & Pinterest? Apparently, these platforms are still in there infancy in NZ and most of us now have a smartphone, which has revolutionised the way we communicate. Jam Mayer was the MC for the evening: articulate & erudite on social. Sarah Evans (Semble) was the shiny new thing (brand) in the room – I agree. What is Semble? “It’s NZ’s mobile wallet where you can pay for things using your phone.” Presently only available on Android. Amazing concept – who needs a purse or wallet (anymore) when you can pay with Semble? Impressed. This event was attended by up to 300 people – monetisation on social is a ‘hot’ subject – the present, our future.  

#SMCAKL: Has Sharing (Content) Peaked?

What do you think? After attending the last Social Media Club – Auckland 2014 event this week, I am (still) of the opinion social media is a ‘game changer’ for the greater good. Without Facebook and LinkedIn I wouldn’t have met people virtually all over the world. Twitter is my ‘godsend’ for finding anything with a hashtag. Instagram, Vine & YouTube let me showcase video and stills for free. Yelp & WordPress are global communities, that I applaud. The panel: Pebbles Hopper (Gossip Columnist), Matt Nippert (Reporter) & Rick Shera (Internet Lawyer) discussed the subject of information sharing and the consequences. Pebbles thinks the Internet is revolutionary and social media is a good thing. Matt talked about Google (best search engine), how social media is so immediate with ‘breaking news’ and how data is collected on everybody when posting on FB, swiping your loyalty cards and uploading photos. Corporations build profiles on their customers, spending habits and food preferences. Rick spoke about ‘A Right To Be Forgotten’ legislation here in NZ, copyright and general legal matters. Unanimously they all agreed ‘social media’ is beneficial and what you share with the world – the Internet will always remember.

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#SMCAKL Event: The Social Media Image Frenzy

After not attending a #smakl event for a while – I was really looking forward to engaging with the ‘specialist’ panel of speakers: Ricardo Simich (Editor Spy HoS), Bradley Ambrose (award-winning photographer), Arran Birchenough (Getty Images ANZ) & Mark Sagar (Lab for Animate Technologies) who all shared their valuable dogma, about the selfie-obsessed society we live in today. Some are the question raised were concerning intellectual property and copyright – in reference to celebrity. Apparently, if you snap pictures in a public place – it’s your image. People (generally) create a lot of content imagery that is uploaded onto Facebook, SnapChat & Instagram. Nothing is private or protected anymore. Everything is transparent and available on Google. What about facial recognition? Have you had the experience before on Facebook when you are tagging people, and they are already recognised? One thing I did learn, is if you want to be published in social pages, newspaper or magazine – refrain from Instagramming and Snapchatting for the event. #SMCAKL always spoils it’s guests with flavoursome pizza, craft beer, wine & cider. Brilliant sponsors. I fell in love with the ‘Playground People’ Instagram Printer – that prints images (similar to a Polaroid, but bigger) that you upload with a hashtag. I know why I love social – it just keeps evolving and being disruptive; without predictability.

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Interview with L.Y.C (Love Your Condom): Ricky Te Akau

1. When/why was LYC initiated?

L.Y.C is a community-focused programme designed to create a condom culture across Aotearoa New Zealand. L.Y.C encourages all gay and bisexual men to use condoms and lube every time they have sex. It is a sexy, upbeat call to ‘love your condom’. ‘Love your condom’ is about moving us past all those lame excuses not to be safe, and inspires us to not just tolerate, but love the sexy confidence that comes with condom covered cocks.

L.Y.C recognises that gay and bisexual men, the people most at risk of HIV, are influenced by their partners, whānau, friends, colleagues, employers and the environment in which they live. While it is essential that L.Y.C reaches and affects all gay and bisexual men living in Aotearoa New Zealand, it is also necessary to reach the people who can support, influence and enable gay and bisexual men to use condoms and lube every time they have anal sex. L.Y.C. Was originally launched in 2009 in it’s first iteration as ‘Get It On!’.

2. What is your role at NZAF?

I am the Social Marketing Coordinator Maori and look after aspects of online and mass media of L.Y.C. with a particular focus on Takatāpui and their whanau.

3. What is your opinion on sex work?

I believe in choices especially choices that empower individuals and allow lives to be lived and no judgements be made. As the old adage says sex work is the oldest profession and has been happening since the dawn of time . . . I think the stigma attached to sex work and workers is a new one.

4. Do you know the current statistics of HIV/AIDS in NZ?

The best place for the most up to date information would be to visit our website at NZAF http: http://www.nzaf.org.nz/

5. What services do NZAF & LYC offer?

Again all our NZAF services are listed on our website with LYC being the social marketing arm that promotes safe sexy times and being empowered in making the right decisions.

6. How could other people in society support NZAF?

There are no boundaries to assisting NZAF be it with your time in volunteering or through donating in a monetary sense. Our doors are always open.

7. What other organisations do NZAF work with?

The list is endless! We work with and support various organisations who likewise support LGBTQI and heterosexual people in either HIV prevention, people living with HIV and those who are there for assistance.

8. Tell me about the last World HIV/AIDS conference you attended in Melbourne last month?

Melbourne was an amazing opportunity to be able to see what other countries are doing in research, prevention and assistance for those affected directly and indirectly with HIV/AIDS. Some 15,000 passionate people from around the world attended and this brought about effective networking, sharing and valuable knowledge.

9. Why do you think HIV/AIDS is still so stigmatized in modern society?

The lack of knowledge around transmission and those that are affected by it. More education around the epidemic is needed and with this would come greater acceptance.

10. What do you think of the word ‘WHORE’?

The word has been bandied around for years and is inexplicably connected with prostitution . . . and in this sense is used in a derogatory way. I’m not one for name calling . . . and don’t think WHORE is an offensive word.

Do You Date Online?

Have you ever used Match.com? I did 10 years ago and dated three men who turned out (respectively) to be an engineer, an art historian and a barrister. Not bad odds. So what about Tinder? I had a quick look at this app and it looks like sex comes easy – to some. Slide the screen across to the left, and simply choose the heart to accept, or X to decline. It’s great to meet people fast in your vicinity, if you get a match – then what? What about Zoosk? You can download this app and connect with people easily too – however you need to pay (handsomely) to chat or message people. I think a lot of us find ‘window shopping’ for potential hook-ups, dates, sex or relationships appealing right? You select and speak to men or women, on your terms without any physical contact. It bets wasting time blind-dating or speed-dating perhaps? Make sure you articulate what you want on these digital dating sites, and it might keep you busy for a while, until the novelty wears off. There are also other dating apps that are globally popular including: Let’s date, e Harmony, OK Cupid, PlentyofFish, Howaboutme, Badoo and Grindr for gay men.

Digital dating is something that is here to stay: transactional relationships, casual intimacy and the occasional marriage.

What are your thoughts? Does it work for you? Why or why not?