Tagged: lifestyle

Interview with Filmmaker & Director: David Blyth

1. Tell me about your latest project?

I have been working on a feature film project with writer Thomas Sainsbury

over the last couple of years. It’s not horror, more a continuing

interest/exploration of characters on the fringes of society.

 

2. Who is your greatest inspiration in film and why?

Luis Bunuel, a Surrealist film maker. Because his films reveal that the

unconscious plays a huge role in our conscious lives and his stories move

seamlessly between dream, fantasy and reality. Bunuel’s first film with

Salvador Dali, Un Chien Andalou, was an inspiration for my own first short

film Circadian Rhythms and the follow up feature film Angel Mine.

 

3. Is horror your preferred genre, as a filmmaker?

Horror is a genre that encompasses a wide range of approaches to telling

stories. I am interested in the psychological and supernatural/magical

elements of our consciousness and the horror genre best describes the

exploration of these areas.

 

4. What do you love about directing?

I love the process of working creatively with others to organically

manifest emotional atmospheres which audiences can engage and resonate

with. Creativity requires participation without fear, and directors role is

to enrol cast and crew into a shared vision that ultimately takes on its

own reality.

 

5. What lessons have you learnt as a prolific filmmaker?

Communication skills are very important at all stages of the film making

process. You have to give yourself permission to make films, if you wait

for “others” to bestow permission, you may be waiting a long time. Most

importantly don’t project your vision on the universe, rather see your

vision in what the universe is showing you.

 

6. Tell me about your most successful film?

Death Warmed Up, 1984, is likely the film that has travelled the world most

successfully and continues to be requested Internationally for relicensing.

Unfortunately this film has a backstory that is tragic. The original film

negative was burnt mistakenly by the Lab in Wellington. The 35mm Inter-

negative is lost in America. No complete 35mm prints exist, and over 32

cuts were made to one of the few one inch tape copies of Death Warmed Up to

survive. So Death Warmed Up has a very bitter sweet place in my life.

 

7. What is the most memorable film you have seen and why?

Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner would have to be the ground breaking film along

with Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead that fuelled certain elements of the vision

presented in Death Warmed Up.

 

8. Do you think the dvd is now redundant?

DVD’S will have an on-going role in private collections and specialised

lending institutions. Mass consumption is moving with the digital times

towards watching online and downloading. I am sorry to see the DVD lose its

position and predict there will be no DVD stores left within two years.

 

9. What makes a good story?

Anything that engages one emotionally that allows universal

truth/understanding to emerge, exploration of the microcosm allows

reflection on the macrocosm.

 

10. Lastly, any advice for emerging filmmakers?

Stick with your vision of the project. It’s a marathon not a sprint. You

need to pace yourself through the inevitable highs and lows. Time is the

micro budget film makers biggest supporter. Flexibility around cast and

crews life commitments, allow a window of opportunity, that ensure you get

the best from everybody whether they are being paid or not.

Review: Bunker Cafe

What a find! Bunker cafe is hidden away – just off Great North Road – not the easiest place to find, however when you do: bliss. I personally love ‘hard to find’ quirky, urban cafes that don’t do conventional. ‘Bunker Cafe’ is just that; a converted container surrounded by designer bean bags, wooden benches, pews and a concrete garden. Atomic coffee is on offer, along with oversized sweet & savoury brioche, gourmet pies, sweet fare and gastronomic European sandwiches filled with a multitude of choices. I decided on the bacon & egg ciabatta that was winking at me. Everything is takeaway: served on disposable plates. Service is fabulous and personable. Parking is scarce. Ambience is a writer’s dream. You better go now before everyone knows about it!

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You Need #Zomato In Your Life

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Have you even heard of “Zomato”? Neither had I until recently. This is an “online restaurant discovery guide” birthed in India in 2008, then launched in New Zealand at the end of 2013.

This is a consumer-driven review platform, where verified bloggers upload content and give their feedback on the overall experience, with a rating of 1 to 5.

Available on iOS, Android, Windows phones, PC and blackberry devices.
I have the app. You have multiple search choices, handsome photos, upto date menus to view (of every cafe/restaurant) and it’s seamless.

It’s accessible, user-friendly and you now save time by knowing the menu!

Great for foodies and busy people!

Social Media Bullying

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Last night I attended #smcakl (Social Media Club, Auckland) event to hear a panel discuss “Is Social Media Anti-Social?”

What do you think?

There was a lot of talk about Charlotte Dawson’s passing and her experience with cyber bullying, on the Twitter platform.

Question: When you become famous or successful, do you somehow get more haters?

I think so, unfortunately. The forum talked about (personally) moderating your content, brand management, the pitfalls of social media and the accessibility of voice, to all.

Some people choose to reveal everything they do via social: take pictures on Instagram, microblog on Twitter, post updates on Facebook and film on SnapChat.

Where does it all stop?

Having a digital footprint is essential in today’s world, however you need to manage the content, how you communicate to followers and most importantly, don’t take the feedback too harshly. Human beings sometimes speak with no filters, is that okay?

In conclusion: social media is modern communication in the online world. Just don’t forget about the offline relationships and networking events, that keep us real.

Relationships At Work: Do You Dare?

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11184955

Have you ever had a relationship with a colleague, or (maybe) your boss?

Sometimes, you can meet the most incredible people in the workplace, right? You normally share (some) common ground, due to working in the same industry, so what happens if you take it further?

Do you keep your relationship strictly professional in the office, and romantic after hours?

Apparently some New Zealand employers (including Air NZ, Fonterra, Telecom, NZ Police, Defence Force) are taking the above quite seriously: ensuring you sign a contract promising “not to have sex with staff.” If you enter a relationship with a colleague, you need to disclose the status quo straight away, or face the (possibly legal) consequences.

Have they gone too far, do you think?

I have had two historical relationships in my (previous) workplace’s sometime ago, and actually married one of them!

So naturally I have an opinion.

Good luck corporates!

Are You A Morning Person?

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Recently, I was interviewed (via twitter) about my morning (daily) routine. Do you have one of those?

After thinking long and hard about (my) consistency, I do actually have a regime, however I am not a stickler for habitual behaviours, at set times.

As an exercise, I googled ‘morning routine’. Most of the images (searchable) were geared at young children, to remind them of their daily tasks/chores, before school.

Therefore, a ‘morning routine’ is (possibly) drummed into us, from pre-school times subconsciously.

Interesting.

The only thing in my morning that is constant: coffee!

How about you?

Do You Know Your Neighbour?

Have we become too aloof, unfriendly, introverted or just never think about, who we live next door to anymore? I have not known my neighbour for years, even decades, literally.

What happened to (those days) when you introduced yourself to the person that just moved in, across the street, or the apartment that is a stone throw from yours. A simple ‘hello’ or ‘great to meet you’. Never happens, too busy maybe?

Now when I can’t find my friend in the house, I text her. No longer do I yell or persevere to look for them – I just pick up my smartphone, and type in what I need to know.

Crazy. So what has happened to the art of communication with our neighbours? Has this time expired?

Do you know your neighbour?