Tagged: interview

Interview with Filmmaker & Director: David Blyth

1. Tell me about your latest project?

I have been working on a feature film project with writer Thomas Sainsbury

over the last couple of years. It’s not horror, more a continuing

interest/exploration of characters on the fringes of society.

 

2. Who is your greatest inspiration in film and why?

Luis Bunuel, a Surrealist film maker. Because his films reveal that the

unconscious plays a huge role in our conscious lives and his stories move

seamlessly between dream, fantasy and reality. Bunuel’s first film with

Salvador Dali, Un Chien Andalou, was an inspiration for my own first short

film Circadian Rhythms and the follow up feature film Angel Mine.

 

3. Is horror your preferred genre, as a filmmaker?

Horror is a genre that encompasses a wide range of approaches to telling

stories. I am interested in the psychological and supernatural/magical

elements of our consciousness and the horror genre best describes the

exploration of these areas.

 

4. What do you love about directing?

I love the process of working creatively with others to organically

manifest emotional atmospheres which audiences can engage and resonate

with. Creativity requires participation without fear, and directors role is

to enrol cast and crew into a shared vision that ultimately takes on its

own reality.

 

5. What lessons have you learnt as a prolific filmmaker?

Communication skills are very important at all stages of the film making

process. You have to give yourself permission to make films, if you wait

for “others” to bestow permission, you may be waiting a long time. Most

importantly don’t project your vision on the universe, rather see your

vision in what the universe is showing you.

 

6. Tell me about your most successful film?

Death Warmed Up, 1984, is likely the film that has travelled the world most

successfully and continues to be requested Internationally for relicensing.

Unfortunately this film has a backstory that is tragic. The original film

negative was burnt mistakenly by the Lab in Wellington. The 35mm Inter-

negative is lost in America. No complete 35mm prints exist, and over 32

cuts were made to one of the few one inch tape copies of Death Warmed Up to

survive. So Death Warmed Up has a very bitter sweet place in my life.

 

7. What is the most memorable film you have seen and why?

Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner would have to be the ground breaking film along

with Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead that fuelled certain elements of the vision

presented in Death Warmed Up.

 

8. Do you think the dvd is now redundant?

DVD’S will have an on-going role in private collections and specialised

lending institutions. Mass consumption is moving with the digital times

towards watching online and downloading. I am sorry to see the DVD lose its

position and predict there will be no DVD stores left within two years.

 

9. What makes a good story?

Anything that engages one emotionally that allows universal

truth/understanding to emerge, exploration of the microcosm allows

reflection on the macrocosm.

 

10. Lastly, any advice for emerging filmmakers?

Stick with your vision of the project. It’s a marathon not a sprint. You

need to pace yourself through the inevitable highs and lows. Time is the

micro budget film makers biggest supporter. Flexibility around cast and

crews life commitments, allow a window of opportunity, that ensure you get

the best from everybody whether they are being paid or not.

Interview With Clash Boutique: Nick Paulsen

1. Where did the name ‘Clash’ come from?The name Clash came from ‘The Clash’ London Calling record. I knew I wanted to start a streetwear business that specialised in British style and I had been actively listening to bands like the Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Specials, The Buzzcocks, Sioux and the Banshees. I had always had a fascination with Britain and the underground street culture that existed around the punk movement in London as I feel that was also when fashion really developed in an individual way rather than a collective. I was sitting back one night listening to a record and noticed the London Calling record at the front of my vinyl stack. It was then I realised how important the word ‘Clash’ was. The bands I was listening to inspired my belief that when it comes to fashion and music there are no right and wrong. Just an open mind that I think does ‘Clash’ with the ideas and ways fashion is presented to people today. People are almost fearful when it comes to fashion and if they don’t have that particular ‘piece’ that is in right now then they won’t be keeping up. These bands and their message to me was to do your own thing and expressing yourself in your own way is so important.

2. Have you always been involved in fashion?

Yes – I worked around clothing retail for a long time. It wasn’t necessarily ‘fashion’ but it taught me a lot about people and their buying habits. It also taught me customer service which is the most important skill to have in any retail job. Starting from a retail assistant I progressed to regional manager looking after handfuls of stores. Previous employers have been both Amazon and Huffer.

3. Where do you get your inspiration from?

Mainly musicians and not because they all have amazing style but because they tend to be the ones that ‘get’ the power of individuality. If I was to give you a style icon I would say any of the characters on Brighton Rock or Snatch. Real cool British gangsters. Or anyone in the band ‘The Specials’.

4. Who buys your clothes?

Haha mostly my parents! I don’t think it’s sympathy but my Dad in particular knows and feels my passion for what we are doing and really enjoys hearing the history of the brands and styles I try and buy in. But I think the beauty of the era that Clash is inspired by is that it attracts young and old. We have sold our Harrington Jackets to men in their 70’s and to men in their 20’s. We attract younger teen girls but also women wanting something they haven’t seen before. So it’s really a mix of ages from different locations.

5. You stock some great brands – do you have a hero label?

I do. Before we had opened the store 4 years ago I had done so much research into brands and how to get them in. So I continue to buy in product and brands for Clash, always on the lookout for something a little different and unique. People say I am a little quirky, so I guess that may come across in some of the styles we get in.

Dr Martens. My favourite brand. Their history and quality is what I love. Everyone can connect in some way to Docs. I love it when we get someone who tells us their story of when they purchased their first pair back in the day or on the flipside when we get a younger customer coming in who is so excited to be getting their first pair. Their styles are timeless.

6. Do you use social media? Which platforms?

We have a pretty large Facebook following which we find helps with getting people to the website. Instagram is small but growing. We also have Twitter. All of these really do help to get the word out.

7. Does ‘Clash’ get involved in NZ Fashion Week or other catwalk shows? Or are you editorial only?

No – Fashion Week isn’t really something we really believe in. We have supported many musicians in the past so often our ‘models’ have been onstage jamming! We are keen to look at other avenues but at the moment like the idea of sticking to our values in having product that everyone can be a part of. Not just a select group.

8. What is you go-to magazine for fashion?

I don’t really have one but I am reading Billy Idol’s autobiography so that would be it at the moment!!

9. Do you think New Zealanders are fashion-conscious?

Depends on what part of the country you are from. I’m originally from Christchurch and have lived in every major city in NZ. I was glad to get away from the overly conservative scene in Christchurch. I found Dunedin to be an amazing place for unique style at a really low budget. People dress amazing down those ways and really feel comfortable with the style they have and the people they are. Wellington is super hip. A mix of op shopping students to wealthy business people with cash to spend. I find Auckland to be an almost smaller fashion scene in the way that it centres around Ponsonby. It’s very trend focused and it seems that a lot of people up here are guided by the Kardashians. I guess being in the big smoke sometimes it feels like there’s more pressure to blend in? We will always try to stick to what inspires us and hopefully that inspires other kiwis! On the whole I think New Zealanders like to dress nice and ultimately it’s someone’s inner self that creates true style.

10. What is the best way to buy from ‘Clash’?

Online at http://www.clash.co.nz or you can visit us at our showroom 264a Ponsonby Rd, just email online@clash.co.nz to make a time!

   

  

  

 

 

 

 

Interview With LEW High Performance: Laura Ehlen-Wilson

Laura has worked as a Sports Therapist & Personal Trainer for 15 years; specialising in Plyometric Training, Pilates, Functional Training & Injury Rehabilitation. In 2014 Laura worked with 3 NRL teams for the Auckland NRL 9’s tournament, New Zealand Warriors League team, New Zealand Kiwis Junior, Seniors Rugby League 4 Nations; England Rugby team while in NZ.

1. When did you discover your love of fitness?

Fitness has always been a big part of my life, even as a child. I come from a very active family: very outdoorsy doing water sports and other activities. Both my brother and I were extremely competitive in sports – as children.
I learnt to push my body very young.
Selected for Scottish junior squad: competitive sprinter and also trained to represent the UK in Heptathlon. Former Sprint Champion.

2. Is being a PT your dream job? If so, why?

I love my job. It’s so unique to have the privilege to transform people’s lives. That could be by something small, like a change in someone’s mind-set. The fact that I work in a multi-disciplinary way with my clients varying from being a sports injury therapist or alternatively functional training to strengthening and conditioning work. Most of my clients (around 60-70%) are professional athletes; I have many other incredible clients that are transforming their lives along with mine.

3. What are your challenges as a personal trainer?

My biggest challenge is to be a great trainer; while also working as an injury rehabilitation therapist, in turn juggling my ‘family life’ which is the ultimate challenge.

4. What sort of people do you train? Athletes? Normal people?

My work involves many different people however I work a lot with teams, sporting organisations and individual athletes both for sports injury therapy and conditioning training. I particularly love working with up-and-coming athletes. The difference I can make to impact their careers is extensive. I love that challenge to work with athletes under crazy time constraints. I also train with corporates and regular people who all have personal goals to get fit, while developing a healthier self; transforming mind and body.

5. Is diet just as important as exercise to reach fitness goals, do you think?

Nutrition impacts on every aspect of our being. Be that physical, spiritual, emotional or otherwise. Everything starts with feeding our body that is the basic fundamental of life. Crack that formula and you’re onto a winner. Nutrition affects everything, not just our physical state but our emotional and cognitive ability.

6. Who would you really like to work with – name anyone?

There is not one individual I think I must work with. People always intrigue me. We all have special talents; it’s about empowering people to have the strength to be their best.

7. Are all your clients victorious?

Victory is in the ‘eye’ of the beholder – always.

8. What is your favourite brand of shoes and sports attire?

I have a few favourites: Nike for general training; Asics for running and NBand Adidas
for cross-training. As for clothing: Lululemon, Nike, Adidas and Reebok.

9. In your opinion – does exercise give you ‘quality of life’?

Yes – without question fitness gives you ‘quality of life’. Our bodies were designed to move. Without movement there can be no life on a microscopic level, or on a global level.

10. What makes you smile?

First and foremost my 3 children. However people in general – I admire people. I love the sound of people’s voices.
When I need to decompress and recharge – nothing bets water. I find it very cleansing. Fresh running water: the ocean or a stream. It brings calmness to my fast paced life.
It’s about balance. When we are happy (inside and out) – we smile without thinking.

Interview With Amy Brosnahan

1) Tell me about for your first modelling job?
My first modelling job was for ‘Battle of the Babes’ which was such an amazing experience. Can’t wait to see what the future brings.

2) What age did you consider yourself female and/or transgender?
I was born a boy – but I was born in the wrong body. I have always been a girl; I just didn’t know how to express it.

3) Who/what is your inspiration?
I have two types of inspirations. My first inspiration would be family and friends. They are always the best kind of inspiration! My second inspiration would be my all time favorite famous idols. I live a happy and full life with no regrets.

4) What is your go-to cosmetic product and why?
MAC make up for sure, it’s just the best for coverage and when you’re in front of a camera – it’s a life saver. Every day I use BB cream.

5) What is your favourite social media platform?
Instagram.

6) What does the word ‘Whore’ mean to you?
It means someone who is unfaithful in a relationship. To be honest I do think the word ‘Whore’ has alot of stigma against it.

7) Are you a ‘shoes’ or ‘handbag’ girl?
I’m both – Come on, every woman loves her shoes and handbags!

8) Are you recognised a lot now after being in the media?
At first I was recognised a lot, but not so much anymore. I want to be successful in life and leave my foot-print on the world.

9) Are there many support groups in NZ for ‘transgender’ youth?
Yes, there is.

10) What makes you laugh?
Funny people, lols, I mean I laugh a lot through my day – it’s good for the soul. If you don’t laugh and have a joke or worse can’t take a joke; in my eyes you’re not living.

My words of wisdom, “Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path…and leave a beautiful and unique trail.”

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Interview With NZPC Founder, Sex Work Activist & Former Sex Worker: Catherine Healy

1. When/Why did you establish NZPC?

We established NZPC in 1987 to support each other and to address the illegality of our work in the face of police arrests and the potential of HIV to affect our work. We were determined to make conditions related to our work safer and had to to build awareness that legislative change was needed for this to happen.

2. Do you directly work with sex workers’ Catherine?

Most of my work involves direct work with sex workers on a daily basis.

3. What is your stance on underage sex work?

NZ shifted its focus to one of protecting sex workers who are under the age of 18, as opposed to one of prosecuting these young people. This used to be the case before the law changed in 2003.

4. Do you know the current statistics of sex workers in NZ?

I’m aware there are thousands of people who are either sex workers, or who have been sex workers, and who live and work quietly in New Zealand. There are many more people who pay sex workers.

5. What services do NZPC offer?

We focus on working safely, and supporting sex workers to access relevant information which can assist them to do this. People who are considering sex work approach NZPC as do those who want to move away from sex work. We support all.

6. How could other people in society support NZPC?

We are aware there are many individuals and organisations who support NZPC by referring those sex workers who may not know about us, to us. This is important support.

7. What other organisations do NZPC work with besides Women’s Refuge?

We work with a tremendous variety of organisations from Family Planning Association to Sexual Health Services to the NZ AIDS Foundation as well as government organisations.

8. Tell me about your involvement in decriminalizing prostitution in NZ? This bill was passed in 2003?

NZPC was instrumental in pushing for the decriminalisation of sex work. I first presented to a select committee as a representative of NZPC calling for this change in 1989. Decriminalisation of sex work has improved the occupational safety and health of sex workers throughout NZ. Street based sex workers were most frequently arrested and convicted of soliciting and it was a demeaning experience.

9. Why do you think ‘sex work’ is still so stigmatized in modern society?

Sex work is stigmatised because non sex workers are not really listening to the diverse voices of sex workers, and are only happy when sex work is depicted as a horrible “empty” experience. Sex workers would say it’s a lot of different kinds of experiences and want to be treated normally, and not as some problem to be fixed.

10. What do you think of the word ‘WHORE’?

WHORE is understood by sex workers to mean, “We Honour Ourselves with Respect and Empowerment.” It is a word which has been reclaimed by sex workers everywhere.

Interview With Artist & Curator: Natalie Tozer

1. How long have you been an artist? Since a dress-up day at primary
school – we had to dress-up ‘to be ‘ what we wanted, when we grew up.
Mum, Dad and I sat down and threw some ideas around, and came up with
‘artist’. A very formative exercise! I wore one of dads work shirts
(super oversize for an 8 year old), a red beanie my nana knitted
(positioned a la beret), found an old brush and made a palette out of card
board.

2. Where do you get your inspiration? Body memory. Repetition and
habit. Daily experiences.

3. Tell me about your exhibitions?
You know when you have a super
twisted dream which you wake up from and just have to tell someone about – for me exhibiting is like that. The world informs you, you mirror your experiences, then you share them. For me the work of an artist is like telling the dream – it’s just one way to describe the experience of living.

4. How do you define your style – as an artist?
I like to provide escapism for people. In contrast to blunt force media and the daily assault of our urban landscape, my style is organic and cellular. The shapes and vibrancy of my work matches what is happening in my life at the time.

5. Favourite colour?
The ‘mother colour’. Where a colour is made from combining all the other colours. Often a complex hue which speaks to all the other colours on the page.

6. Who would you (really) like to meet? Charles Saatchi maybe?
I’d love to meet Patricia Piccinini. Check out her work online and see why! She has incredible vision as an artist. Her works remind me of the
characters in one of my favorite novels by Margaret Atwood ‘Oryx and
Crake’. In fact these two powerhouse woman should meet each other as well. Although incredibly different from my work, the organic forms imagined in both these artists worlds are deeply inspiring to me and what I think about and try to convey in an abstract way.

7. Any influences?
People and experiences. Life is the same.

8. Do you believe in serendipity? Absolutely. In my work I chase
‘happy accidents’. The forms are fluid and design can only contribute to
50% of the outcome. Life is the same.

9. When it comes to chocolate -Cadbury or Whittakers?
If I’m at the supermarket I’d reach for Whittakers first, every time. But my Dad always has a stash of Cadbury, which I raid with glee.

10. What makes you smile?
Smiling!

Project whore: interview #2

charlatan clinic

1. What are your thoughts on prostitution?

Prostitution. I guess, this conjures up (for me) the seedy side of sex… people that pay for it must not be “able” to get sex through a mutual loving or caring for each other, as individuals..it’s the whole “transactional” thing that I suppose gets me..that it’s still very in the shadows of society, and it does intrigue me why people become prostitutes and the emotional impact it must have.

2. Have you slept with a sex worker before?

Never slept with a sex worker.

3. Why or why not?

Never felt the need or desire.

4. What does the word ‘whore’ mean to you?

Whore means to me, a woman who allows her body to be used easily by lots of men…for whatever reason.

5. Do you belief in monogamy?

I used to believe in it, but think it’s unrealistic.

6. Have you…

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