Tagged: charlatan clinic

Interview with Filmmaker & Director: David Blyth

1. Tell me about your latest project?

I have been working on a feature film project with writer Thomas Sainsbury

over the last couple of years. It’s not horror, more a continuing

interest/exploration of characters on the fringes of society.

 

2. Who is your greatest inspiration in film and why?

Luis Bunuel, a Surrealist film maker. Because his films reveal that the

unconscious plays a huge role in our conscious lives and his stories move

seamlessly between dream, fantasy and reality. Bunuel’s first film with

Salvador Dali, Un Chien Andalou, was an inspiration for my own first short

film Circadian Rhythms and the follow up feature film Angel Mine.

 

3. Is horror your preferred genre, as a filmmaker?

Horror is a genre that encompasses a wide range of approaches to telling

stories. I am interested in the psychological and supernatural/magical

elements of our consciousness and the horror genre best describes the

exploration of these areas.

 

4. What do you love about directing?

I love the process of working creatively with others to organically

manifest emotional atmospheres which audiences can engage and resonate

with. Creativity requires participation without fear, and directors role is

to enrol cast and crew into a shared vision that ultimately takes on its

own reality.

 

5. What lessons have you learnt as a prolific filmmaker?

Communication skills are very important at all stages of the film making

process. You have to give yourself permission to make films, if you wait

for “others” to bestow permission, you may be waiting a long time. Most

importantly don’t project your vision on the universe, rather see your

vision in what the universe is showing you.

 

6. Tell me about your most successful film?

Death Warmed Up, 1984, is likely the film that has travelled the world most

successfully and continues to be requested Internationally for relicensing.

Unfortunately this film has a backstory that is tragic. The original film

negative was burnt mistakenly by the Lab in Wellington. The 35mm Inter-

negative is lost in America. No complete 35mm prints exist, and over 32

cuts were made to one of the few one inch tape copies of Death Warmed Up to

survive. So Death Warmed Up has a very bitter sweet place in my life.

 

7. What is the most memorable film you have seen and why?

Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner would have to be the ground breaking film along

with Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead that fuelled certain elements of the vision

presented in Death Warmed Up.

 

8. Do you think the dvd is now redundant?

DVD’S will have an on-going role in private collections and specialised

lending institutions. Mass consumption is moving with the digital times

towards watching online and downloading. I am sorry to see the DVD lose its

position and predict there will be no DVD stores left within two years.

 

9. What makes a good story?

Anything that engages one emotionally that allows universal

truth/understanding to emerge, exploration of the microcosm allows

reflection on the macrocosm.

 

10. Lastly, any advice for emerging filmmakers?

Stick with your vision of the project. It’s a marathon not a sprint. You

need to pace yourself through the inevitable highs and lows. Time is the

micro budget film makers biggest supporter. Flexibility around cast and

crews life commitments, allow a window of opportunity, that ensure you get

the best from everybody whether they are being paid or not.

Whore Films Showcasing @ Capitol Cinema

A lot of people ask Melissa why she named her project ‘Whore’.
The reason being is that sex workers’ claim that name. Melissa wrote six monologues about street sex workers in late 2013. Three actors each performed two monologues, to sell-out audiences in Auckland & Wellington in 2014.

“Whore consists of six beautifully structured monologues performed serially by three actors. The text was constructed by Fergusson from extensive interviews with sex workers and it’s exceptional. She has consulted with the New Zealand AIDS Foundation and the New Zealand Prostitutes Collective and the entire show has a sense of authenticity that is at the heart of its success because successful it truly is.” – Lexie Matheson, ONZM

Now adapted to screen, six short films: Illegal Migrant, Married Woman, Underage Sex Worker, Rent Boy, Transgender & Refugee each runs for 12 minutes; based on true stories of street sex workers living in Auckland.
“An emotionally effecting and unflinching series of short films that sets out to reveal the real and human side to people who work under the label of “sex worker” and achieves this objective with aplomb.” – Kathryn Burnett, Award-Winning Screenwriter
Melissa is the Creative Director of charlatan clinic; she has directed over twenty theatre productions, six short films and is writing her first feature film presently.

 

Whore Films @ Capitol Cinema, 610 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland on July 20 & 21 at 8pm, 2016. Tickets available from http://www.iticket.co.nz

 

Filming ‘Rent boy’: Behind The Scenes

Director: Melissa Fergusson

DOP: Tim Butler-Jones

1st AD/Sound Tech: Rob Ipsen

Art Department: Lina Cruz

Makeup & Hair Stylist: Angela Crumpe

Rent boy: Lee ah yen Faatoia

Stripper: Christine Becker

Probation officer: Baz Te Hira

Homeless man: Gabriel Henry

John: Michael Hallows

Special thanks: Paper Bag Princess, Christine Becker, Four Eyes Media, Rebecca Parr, Cafe Al-Madina, Topic Rentals, Splice & LYC.

   
    
    
    
    
   
     

 

Rehearsals: ‘Rent boy’

Director: Melissa Fergusson

Rent boy: Lee ah yen Faatoia

Stripper: Christine Becker

Homeless man: Gabriel Henry

Probation officer: Baz Te Hira

John: Michael Hallows

   
    
    
 

Filming ‘Refugee’: Behind The Scenes

Director: Melissa Fergusson

DOP: Tim Butler-Jones

1st AD/Sound Tech: Rob Ipsen

Location Manager: John Blackman

MUA: Angela Crumpe

Hair Designer: Jordan Camilleri 

Stylist: Melissa Fergusson

Refugee: Rebecca Parr

Psych patient: Gaby Turner

Counsellor: Rob Ipsen

Foreigner: John Blackman

Dealer: Baz Te Hira

John: Rhys Collier

Featured extras: Laura Ehlen-Wilson, Olliver Fergusson, Hudson Turner, Cooper Turner

Special thanks to Katherine Hair, The Rose Centre, John Blackman, Paper Bag Princess,  Love Your Condom, Splice, Four Eyes Media & Donna Banichevic-Gera x

   
    
    
    
    
    
    

    
    

   
 

Production Meeting (2): ‘Refugee’

Director: Melissa Fergusson 1st AD: Rob Ipsen DOP: Tim Butler-Jones MUA: Angela Crumpe Hair Designer: Jordan Camilleri Refugee (Lead): Rebecca Parr Counsellor: Rob Ipsen Psych patient: Gaby Turner Dealer: Baz Te Hira Foreigner: John Blackman John: Rhys Collier

http://charlatancliniclimited.com/2015/08/18/production-meeting-2-refugee/

Yelp Event: #Aucklandmade with “The Lucky Taco” at Lot 23

As luck is on my side – I was recently invited to attend the first series of ‘Artisan’ talks hosted by Yelp Auckland at Lot 23. First up (of these talks) was Otis & Sarah Frizzell who founded, own & presently operate “The Lucky Taco”, since May 2013. I was intrigued to hear all about their entrepreneurial journey and their ‘go to’ product; so far they have collaborated with the likes of Nice Blocks, The Collective NZ (no bull yoghurt), BMW and endless others. Like all start-ups – Otis & Sarah – have had an action-packed ride on the path to success. I was delighted to try some of the ‘hot’ sauces on offer including Halanero, Jalapeño & Chipotle. Now stocked in 60 ‘New World’ supermarkets across New Zealand, so you can now have this on tap in your pantry! I purchased some (not on the market yet) ‘Chilli Salt’ which I can’t wait to try on poached eggs! ‘Auckland in a box’ were showcasing too – with a giveaway of local artisan products. Lot 23 is an exceptional space for events, executed to a high standard.  The crowd finished off all the sample tacos in record time. Impressed. Nice one Yelp: Gold. That’s all.