Category: Theatre

Theatre review: ‘Gorge’ by Virginia Frankovich & Phoebe Mason

  

Walking into a ‘fairyland’ of gluttony made me reminisce my childhood birthday parties. A space over-flowing with green jelly, decadent cupcakes, salty popcorn, chelsea buns, chocolate cornflake slice, iced-pink biscuits & sugar aplenty – a feast for queens and the audience, of course. I did not see the first season of ‘Gorge’ that showcased at Auckland Fringe Festival in March 2013 – however it was worth the wait. ‘Gorge’ is storytelling at its finest – about gluttony. Virginia Frankovich and Phoebe Mason were majestically outstanding as they played different characters, engaged with the audience, stimulated our imagination and questioned our relationship with sugar. Apparently ‘we are what we eat’. I love sugar – don’t you? Give me some tiramisu any day.  I applaud the ‘Gorge’ girls. See you again in 2016.

Filming ‘Refugee’: Behind The Scenes

Director: Melissa Fergusson

DOP: Tim Butler-Jones

1st AD/Sound Tech: Rob Ipsen

Location Manager: John Blackman

MUA: Angela Crumpe

Hair Designer: Jordan Camilleri 

Stylist: Melissa Fergusson

Refugee: Rebecca Parr

Psych patient: Gaby Turner

Counsellor: Rob Ipsen

Foreigner: John Blackman

Dealer: Baz Te Hira

John: Rhys Collier

Featured extras: Laura Ehlen-Wilson, Olliver Fergusson, Hudson Turner, Cooper Turner

Special thanks to Katherine Hair, The Rose Centre, John Blackman, Paper Bag Princess,  Love Your Condom, Splice, Four Eyes Media & Donna Banichevic-Gera x

   
    
    
    
    
    
    

    
    

   
 

#Yelp Event: So Fresh & So Clean

Yelp Auckland – you did good. Thievery studio is an understated, urban, artist’s ‘dream space’ for photographers (namely Garth Badger), filmmakers, event producers, fashion designers and anyone wanting a creative hideaway on the infamous Karangahape Road. Attending ‘So Fresh & So Clean’ last night was an outstanding event showcasing ‘Honey Trap’ (Hummingbird Cake & Mini chicken club sandwiches), ‘Cocoloco’ (Pure coconut water & Spiced Stolen Rum with coconut water) – truely orgasmic. ‘Room by Room’ (affordable & accessible) interior design consultation, who gave away gorgeous cacti wrapped in recycled brown paper. ‘Invivo’ sampling delicious red wine, ‘Garage Project’ with their array of craft beer from Te Aro, ‘Antipodes’ sparkling & flat water that I can never drink enough of. ‘Bird on a Wire’ with paleo-style fare. The dip was heaven. ‘Little Eats’ was sampling a deconstructed creme brûlée-like sweet & a bite size spicy pastrami treats, ‘Bluebells Cakery’ offered ginger crunch, chocolate brownie, mini jammy donuts & more gastronomy! I drunk the Clasico & Rose Cava and nibbled on most of the above. The highlight was the Spiced Stolen Rum Cocoloco, the carefully positioned life-size zebra mounted on the wall, ‘Honey Trap’ clubs and Yelp for always exceeding my expectations – Yelp me!

   

             

Review: Junk & Disorderly

‘Junk & Disorderly’ is a second-hand shoppers’ haven: inundated with everything vintage including timeless books, kitsch ornaments, old-school pails, rocking horses, dainty tables, mannequins, crockery, 1970’s sofas and the kitchen sink. Serious. I absolutely adore this oversized jumble-sale – that favours the consumer. I have purchased, borrowed and browsed this awe-inspiring warehouse for days without boredom. Parking is a dream; located in the heart of Northcote – go and find some treasure now or miss out.

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Review: First Scene (Fancy Dress)

Are you having a fancy dress party? This is the place to venture to – if so. Word. Whether it’s an Elizabethan gig and you’re looking for ruffs, pantaloons, jerkins, corsets, queens & kings wigs – they have this covered. Or maybe you’re after Bollywood attire? I have indeed hired ruffs, tutus, props, wigs and costuming from First Scene. It’s rather overwhelming place to visit – so make sure you ask someone for assistance – if you’re short on time. I particularly like the selection of false eyelashes, theatre makeup and their shoe selection. All the staff are suitably friendly and helpful. Based just over the hill from Kingsland’s Main Street (shops and cafes) so very convenient and centrally located with parking right outside the building. Cool. Majestic. Transformative. Check it out.

First Scene

Interactive Art: Don’t Talk To Strangers

Recently, I went to this intriguing art exhibition called ‘Don’t Talk To Strangers’ at Bridge Gallery Studio, off Karangahape Road. When I arrived after 10am (opening time), there was no one there, and was alerted to a note in the window to call a mobile – in this instance. I went away and returned 30 minutes later to find a welcoming young French woman who offered me tea. I declined, after just having coffee. There was a collection of eclectic objects on tin shelves, that all had a hand-written (personal) story attached, ranging from a thimble, painting, nail set, dried flower, postcard, book and so forth.

“Attendees can choose an existing object from the gallery to take home with them, in a sort of trade-like marketplace. Participants are also given the opportunity to write a small note to accompany their object, sharing its past, or its significance for its former owner. It’s all very sentimental.”

I wrote my note and left my object after discussing the content on the shelves (and their previous owners) with the curator. I always speak to strangers, including today when I asked a complete stranger to jump over my fence, as I had accidentally locked myself out of my house. Sometimes gifts are warranted, other times a kind exchange of words is ample for an ever-lasting memory.
Strangers can shape our world and alter our mood – for the better.

Interview with L.Y.C (Love Your Condom): Ricky Te Akau

1. When/why was LYC initiated?

L.Y.C is a community-focused programme designed to create a condom culture across Aotearoa New Zealand. L.Y.C encourages all gay and bisexual men to use condoms and lube every time they have sex. It is a sexy, upbeat call to ‘love your condom’. ‘Love your condom’ is about moving us past all those lame excuses not to be safe, and inspires us to not just tolerate, but love the sexy confidence that comes with condom covered cocks.

L.Y.C recognises that gay and bisexual men, the people most at risk of HIV, are influenced by their partners, whānau, friends, colleagues, employers and the environment in which they live. While it is essential that L.Y.C reaches and affects all gay and bisexual men living in Aotearoa New Zealand, it is also necessary to reach the people who can support, influence and enable gay and bisexual men to use condoms and lube every time they have anal sex. L.Y.C. Was originally launched in 2009 in it’s first iteration as ‘Get It On!’.

2. What is your role at NZAF?

I am the Social Marketing Coordinator Maori and look after aspects of online and mass media of L.Y.C. with a particular focus on Takatāpui and their whanau.

3. What is your opinion on sex work?

I believe in choices especially choices that empower individuals and allow lives to be lived and no judgements be made. As the old adage says sex work is the oldest profession and has been happening since the dawn of time . . . I think the stigma attached to sex work and workers is a new one.

4. Do you know the current statistics of HIV/AIDS in NZ?

The best place for the most up to date information would be to visit our website at NZAF http: http://www.nzaf.org.nz/

5. What services do NZAF & LYC offer?

Again all our NZAF services are listed on our website with LYC being the social marketing arm that promotes safe sexy times and being empowered in making the right decisions.

6. How could other people in society support NZAF?

There are no boundaries to assisting NZAF be it with your time in volunteering or through donating in a monetary sense. Our doors are always open.

7. What other organisations do NZAF work with?

The list is endless! We work with and support various organisations who likewise support LGBTQI and heterosexual people in either HIV prevention, people living with HIV and those who are there for assistance.

8. Tell me about the last World HIV/AIDS conference you attended in Melbourne last month?

Melbourne was an amazing opportunity to be able to see what other countries are doing in research, prevention and assistance for those affected directly and indirectly with HIV/AIDS. Some 15,000 passionate people from around the world attended and this brought about effective networking, sharing and valuable knowledge.

9. Why do you think HIV/AIDS is still so stigmatized in modern society?

The lack of knowledge around transmission and those that are affected by it. More education around the epidemic is needed and with this would come greater acceptance.

10. What do you think of the word ‘WHORE’?

The word has been bandied around for years and is inexplicably connected with prostitution . . . and in this sense is used in a derogatory way. I’m not one for name calling . . . and don’t think WHORE is an offensive word.