Category: Social media

Father Rabbit Co-Op Event: Wine & Chocolate

Does a “wine glass” make all the difference when drinking red or white wine? 
Conclusion: Yes, 100% when it’s Plumm glassware.

I attended Father Rabbit’s 1st Co-Op event hosted by Claudia ZinZan; Johnny from Red & White Cellar who showcased the stunning Plumm glassware with delicious NZ wines from Lake Hayes, Quarter Acre & Amisfield. Who knew pouring Chardonnay into a ‘Plumm’ White(a) glass would alter the aroma and taste opposed to a White(b) glass? Gobsmacked. Really.


On the left – White(a) On the right – White(b).

My personal favourite was Plumm glass Red(b) with the Pinot Noir (tasting) which dazzled and delighted my palate.


Bennetts (chocolate) of Mangawhai didn’t disappoint -suitably milk or dark chocolate that complimented the wine pairings with gusto.


What an education. What fun. ‘Father Rabbit’ exceeded my expectation to experience something distinctive. From now on – I can appreciate a Plumm wine glass in an erudite way. My friend and I purchased a few ‘must-haves’ before dashing off into the Jervois Road. Looking forward to the second Co-Op, it can’t come soon enough. 

Whore Films Showcasing @ Capitol Cinema

A lot of people ask Melissa why she named her project ‘Whore’.
The reason being is that sex workers’ claim that name. Melissa wrote six monologues about street sex workers in late 2013. Three actors each performed two monologues, to sell-out audiences in Auckland & Wellington in 2014.

“Whore consists of six beautifully structured monologues performed serially by three actors. The text was constructed by Fergusson from extensive interviews with sex workers and it’s exceptional. She has consulted with the New Zealand AIDS Foundation and the New Zealand Prostitutes Collective and the entire show has a sense of authenticity that is at the heart of its success because successful it truly is.” – Lexie Matheson, ONZM

Now adapted to screen, six short films: Illegal Migrant, Married Woman, Underage Sex Worker, Rent Boy, Transgender & Refugee each runs for 12 minutes; based on true stories of street sex workers living in Auckland.
“An emotionally effecting and unflinching series of short films that sets out to reveal the real and human side to people who work under the label of “sex worker” and achieves this objective with aplomb.” – Kathryn Burnett, Award-Winning Screenwriter
Melissa is the Creative Director of charlatan clinic; she has directed over twenty theatre productions, six short films and is writing her first feature film presently.

 

Whore Films @ Capitol Cinema, 610 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland on July 20 & 21 at 8pm, 2016. Tickets available from http://www.iticket.co.nz

 

Personal Training With LEW High Performance

Can I get my dream body in 8 weeks? They say you can, so therefore I’m training with the best: Laura Ehlen-Wilson who has been in the fitness industry for 14 years specialising in Pilates, strength training & body conditioning. Laura & I are working on nutrition as well as fitness, to achieve optimum results in 50 days! There isn’t a magic wand to miraculously look 22 years younger – there’s just physical hard work and self discipline. Here is the start of my journey on being the best I can be in early April 2016. Does it really matter what you put in your mouth? Not when you’re 14, however in your 30’s your body starts to rebel. I don’t have any allergies nor phobias. I don’t take diet pills or laxatives. It’s all about truth with no filters. Transparency peeps. Making it happen, one day at a time. 

   
   

 

Theatre review: ‘Gorge’ by Virginia Frankovich & Phoebe Mason

  

Walking into a ‘fairyland’ of gluttony made me reminisce my childhood birthday parties. A space over-flowing with green jelly, decadent cupcakes, salty popcorn, chelsea buns, chocolate cornflake slice, iced-pink biscuits & sugar aplenty – a feast for queens and the audience, of course. I did not see the first season of ‘Gorge’ that showcased at Auckland Fringe Festival in March 2013 – however it was worth the wait. ‘Gorge’ is storytelling at its finest – about gluttony. Virginia Frankovich and Phoebe Mason were majestically outstanding as they played different characters, engaged with the audience, stimulated our imagination and questioned our relationship with sugar. Apparently ‘we are what we eat’. I love sugar – don’t you? Give me some tiramisu any day.  I applaud the ‘Gorge’ girls. See you again in 2016.

Spread The Love With #CondomEmoji: World AIDS Day, 1st December

Though we don’t hear about it much in the news these days (except in unison with the name Charlie Sheen), globally, there are currently an estimated 34 million people who have the HIV virus. Which is why World AIDs Day, which happens tomorrow, is a timely reminder of the importance of safe sex.  

To coincide with World AIDs, Durex, has launched a campaign calling for the creation of the world’s first official safe sex emoji. Launched less than a fortnight ago, the campaign has seen people from around the world calling for the creation of the #CondomEmoji and more than 2 million people viewed this humorous video about the need for the emoji.

 

The need to re-think the way we discuss safe sex with 16 – 25 year olds is backed up by research conducted by Professor Mark McCormack at Durham University, which found more than a third of 16 – 25 year olds don’t care about safe sex and a quarter believe HIV/AIDS is an issue that mainly only affects people in Africa. 

 

It’s concerning that 16 – 25 years show such apathy towards safe sex. The solution? Speak to them a in a language they’ll understand: emojis! 

 

Interview With Clash Boutique: Nick Paulsen

1. Where did the name ‘Clash’ come from?The name Clash came from ‘The Clash’ London Calling record. I knew I wanted to start a streetwear business that specialised in British style and I had been actively listening to bands like the Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Specials, The Buzzcocks, Sioux and the Banshees. I had always had a fascination with Britain and the underground street culture that existed around the punk movement in London as I feel that was also when fashion really developed in an individual way rather than a collective. I was sitting back one night listening to a record and noticed the London Calling record at the front of my vinyl stack. It was then I realised how important the word ‘Clash’ was. The bands I was listening to inspired my belief that when it comes to fashion and music there are no right and wrong. Just an open mind that I think does ‘Clash’ with the ideas and ways fashion is presented to people today. People are almost fearful when it comes to fashion and if they don’t have that particular ‘piece’ that is in right now then they won’t be keeping up. These bands and their message to me was to do your own thing and expressing yourself in your own way is so important.

2. Have you always been involved in fashion?

Yes – I worked around clothing retail for a long time. It wasn’t necessarily ‘fashion’ but it taught me a lot about people and their buying habits. It also taught me customer service which is the most important skill to have in any retail job. Starting from a retail assistant I progressed to regional manager looking after handfuls of stores. Previous employers have been both Amazon and Huffer.

3. Where do you get your inspiration from?

Mainly musicians and not because they all have amazing style but because they tend to be the ones that ‘get’ the power of individuality. If I was to give you a style icon I would say any of the characters on Brighton Rock or Snatch. Real cool British gangsters. Or anyone in the band ‘The Specials’.

4. Who buys your clothes?

Haha mostly my parents! I don’t think it’s sympathy but my Dad in particular knows and feels my passion for what we are doing and really enjoys hearing the history of the brands and styles I try and buy in. But I think the beauty of the era that Clash is inspired by is that it attracts young and old. We have sold our Harrington Jackets to men in their 70’s and to men in their 20’s. We attract younger teen girls but also women wanting something they haven’t seen before. So it’s really a mix of ages from different locations.

5. You stock some great brands – do you have a hero label?

I do. Before we had opened the store 4 years ago I had done so much research into brands and how to get them in. So I continue to buy in product and brands for Clash, always on the lookout for something a little different and unique. People say I am a little quirky, so I guess that may come across in some of the styles we get in.

Dr Martens. My favourite brand. Their history and quality is what I love. Everyone can connect in some way to Docs. I love it when we get someone who tells us their story of when they purchased their first pair back in the day or on the flipside when we get a younger customer coming in who is so excited to be getting their first pair. Their styles are timeless.

6. Do you use social media? Which platforms?

We have a pretty large Facebook following which we find helps with getting people to the website. Instagram is small but growing. We also have Twitter. All of these really do help to get the word out.

7. Does ‘Clash’ get involved in NZ Fashion Week or other catwalk shows? Or are you editorial only?

No – Fashion Week isn’t really something we really believe in. We have supported many musicians in the past so often our ‘models’ have been onstage jamming! We are keen to look at other avenues but at the moment like the idea of sticking to our values in having product that everyone can be a part of. Not just a select group.

8. What is you go-to magazine for fashion?

I don’t really have one but I am reading Billy Idol’s autobiography so that would be it at the moment!!

9. Do you think New Zealanders are fashion-conscious?

Depends on what part of the country you are from. I’m originally from Christchurch and have lived in every major city in NZ. I was glad to get away from the overly conservative scene in Christchurch. I found Dunedin to be an amazing place for unique style at a really low budget. People dress amazing down those ways and really feel comfortable with the style they have and the people they are. Wellington is super hip. A mix of op shopping students to wealthy business people with cash to spend. I find Auckland to be an almost smaller fashion scene in the way that it centres around Ponsonby. It’s very trend focused and it seems that a lot of people up here are guided by the Kardashians. I guess being in the big smoke sometimes it feels like there’s more pressure to blend in? We will always try to stick to what inspires us and hopefully that inspires other kiwis! On the whole I think New Zealanders like to dress nice and ultimately it’s someone’s inner self that creates true style.

10. What is the best way to buy from ‘Clash’?

Online at http://www.clash.co.nz or you can visit us at our showroom 264a Ponsonby Rd, just email online@clash.co.nz to make a time!

   

  

  

 

 

 

 

Filming ‘Rent boy’: Behind The Scenes

Director: Melissa Fergusson

DOP: Tim Butler-Jones

1st AD/Sound Tech: Rob Ipsen

Art Department: Lina Cruz

Makeup & Hair Stylist: Angela Crumpe

Rent boy: Lee ah yen Faatoia

Stripper: Christine Becker

Probation officer: Baz Te Hira

Homeless man: Gabriel Henry

John: Michael Hallows

Special thanks: Paper Bag Princess, Christine Becker, Four Eyes Media, Rebecca Parr, Cafe Al-Madina, Topic Rentals, Splice & LYC.